Wills, Trusts & Powers of Attorney

Safeguarding Our Clients' Legacies

A will is an essential document for any Illinois resident. It determines who will receive your assets, who will care for your children, and who will fulfill your expressed wishes after you die.

Fail to complete a will, and you lose control over your legacy. Your estate will be distributed among your survivors according to Illinois statute, not according to your preference.

Regardless of the complexity of your asset situation, the attorneys of Johnson & Johnson, Attorneys at Law, recommend that you work with an experienced estate lawyer to draft a will.

Contact us in Belleville, Illinois, for a confidential and free initial consultation.

Draft a Simple Will, or Something More Complex

A will is a powerful document that gives comfort and assurance to your loved ones in the event of your death. With the help of our estate attorneys, you can draft additional documents by which you can:

  • Appoint a guardian to care for your children or wards
  • Name a personal representative to administer your estate
  • Grant durable power of attorney to an executor of your choosing to oversee your finances and health care if you are incapacitated
  • Draft a "living will" or advance health care directive to specify the level of medical care you wish to receive in the event you are incapacitated
  • Set up a trust to manage your assets

The Gift of Trust

As part of our estate planning practice, we assist clients in establishing various planning tools for their assets, including:

Revocable/Irrevocable trusts: Depending on your needs and goals, we can work with you to create revocable or irrevocable trusts to protect and direct your assets both before and after your death

Special needs trusts: We can also work to establish a special needs trust to care for the medical and material needs of a mentally or physically disabled loved one.

Living trusts: Further, through a living trust, you can manage your assets during your lifetime and provide for your loved ones after your death. Unlike a will, a living trust does not enter probate after your death. As a result, you have full control over where your assets are apportioned.

Appointing a trustee: Like other estate planning tools, a trust requires an administrator to watch over it. This person, called a trustee, is granted control of your property but must follow your strict instructions. We can help you draft documents defining both the beneficiaries and the benefits of your trust.

Johnson & Johnson - Your Assets, Your Way

For a free initial consultation with an experienced trust lawyer, call Johnson & Johnson at 618-207-4137 or 888-628-8977 toll free.